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Author Topic: Multiplying Onions  (Read 6231 times)
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tbird
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« on: February 27, 2011, 03:37:03 PM »

Last October I planted 100 multiplying onions.  Now these are not the "Walking" onions,  but Multiplying or Bunching onions.  I picked them up at the local Feed & Seed from a large bin.  All they were labeled as was "multiplying Onions".

So today in my brief walk out to the garden,  I noticed that the onions have many topsets coming out of the ground which means they have created more bulbs and some are beginning to bolt.  My question to anyone that has grown these before is,  Are they ready to be harvested?   Huh?
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reartinetiller
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2011, 04:29:54 PM »

TBird, never grew them, but don't you just use the tops and leave the bulbs in the ground?  Roy
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Gardnman
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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2011, 05:36:37 PM »

Are you refering to scallions or chives by chance?


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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2011, 05:41:11 PM »

  Nope.  Scallion and Chives are a very different animal.  These are called Multiplying Onions.  You plant one bulb and they grow other bulbs off their sides.  You can and do use the tops,  but the bulbs are also harvested and used similar to Shallots.  The bulbs however can be induced to grow larger and used as smaller table onions.   Wink
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Cubman
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« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2011, 05:46:36 PM »

tops should've been cut back a couple weeks ago...new growth can/could be used as scallions as long as tops aren't allowed to get to large/tuff...bulb harvest at the time of top set, when/allow(ed) to reseed if desired...replant/seperate the smaller buld and go again...
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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2011, 05:51:28 PM »

tops should've been cut back a couple weeks ago...new growth can/could be used as scallions as long as tops aren't allowed to get to large/tuff...bulb harvest at the time of top set, when/allow(ed) to reseed if desired...replant/seperate the smaller buld and go again...


  Now Dat's what I'm talkin' 'bout fo sho!  Thanks Cub!   Grin  Grin  Grin Grin  Grin
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Barking Dog Farm

18.25 Acres in Central West Louisiana | USDA Zone 8b

Isaiah 66:22, 23, 24

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Misplaced Texan
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« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2011, 06:45:29 PM »

I used to pull mine in the spring.  i would cut up and freeze most and replant a row after cutting off the green part.  by fall they would need cutting again.

I kept the same onions for years.

Gail
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texasfarmer
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« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2011, 06:55:52 PM »

I raise and sell a lot of the white multiplying onions.I plant dry bulbs in september and let them grow and multiply them selves,pulling the first ones for thanksgiving.I do not cut any tops nor seperate them until I harvest the whole clump.I loosen them with a fork,pull them up ,cut the roots off with a big knife,break up the clump,strip the dead leaves and dirt off,bunch them with rubber bands,trim tops to a manageable length,wash them and sell them.A lot of hand work for $.50/ bunch.If you work fast you can earn minimum wage Grin.......These do not set bulbs in the tops like the walking onions but bloom and go to seed like bulb onions,but I have never collected any seed.I doubt even if the seed was viable, it would be the same type.Always propigated from bulbs.These are large,averaging in size of a mans middle finger. There also is a smaller multiplying onion with a slight purple tint but they dont produce as well, and are prone to have many dead tips on the leaves and are very slow to clean.........Almost the entire plant can be used green or chop and dry them.I think it was cajun transplant who shared a picture of hers a week or so ago........These are not a sweet onion but are mild enough to eat raw but are great in cooking.....You can still harvest when they start bolting,just break that stalk.Harvest can last up to Easter.When tops are mostly dry(usually late may) dig and store in a dry airy place until time to plant again.The mature,dry bulb can be esaten but the labor to clean is extreme,resulting in piece the size of a peanut.,,,,,Oh if you clen enough,people comment obout your odor.............Thatsssssss alllllll folksssss Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy
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« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2011, 08:08:07 PM »

Mr. T-Bird Sir,

Being a rank amature, take this for what it is worth:

In the fall, I bought the "green onion bulbs" and as discribed to the rank amature, they were multipliers...So I planted them and from each SINGLE bulb, I have developed 3 to 5 additional bulbs... Put them in last August/September and they grew VERY well in my 5 gallon pots. Cold weather did not seem to bother them a bit. The Mrs. was low on onions and hence I pulled, clean and then chopped them, enough to fill 2 "1 gallon freezer bags" and this has made the Mrs quite happy.

Now, to me these were a much fatter common green onion. Just like the kind that I saw from the mexicans for $1 per bunch this evening at the store. Now, I have another 6 pots going and they have made 3 to 5 additional onions per single bulb. I replanted in January and they are up and growing well. I have several staff members at the office who are doing the same thing with the same results.

David
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David
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« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2011, 09:43:20 PM »

Everybody (IMHO) needs a pot of green onions of some sort close outside the kitchen door.  Very often I find them useful when it's dark, freezing or otherwise inconvenient to go all the way to the garden.
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« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2011, 02:27:58 AM »

Thank you Tuttimato, you gave me my 416th reason for having a kid. "Running to the garden to pull sumthin' while Daddy is cookin.

Robie(insert smiley emotion)
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