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Author Topic: Fire starting with "lighter knot" or "fat starter"  (Read 4663 times)
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bigcountry1009
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« on: February 13, 2011, 07:39:37 PM »

Some body tell me the proper way of using a piece of old pine lighter knot.  Should it light up with a match?  I've got a great big piece i found this weekend when I pushed a tree over.
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mhpgardener
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« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2011, 07:45:11 PM »

I dont know about a "proper" way, but a fella gave me a 4 foot piece a couple weeks ago. I cut it in about 8 inch pieces and use it just like a starter log. Stack a few small pieces of wood on top, light it with a propane torch (who has time for matches?), and the fire is easy to get going.
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bigcountry1009
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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2011, 07:53:05 PM »

UGH UGH UGH, I hear you Bobby.  We don't need no stinking matches. 
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Clinton, SC
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linhawk
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« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2011, 07:59:18 AM »

A man gave me some pine fatwood a couple of years ago. It was oily looking and lit easily with a match. It burned with a very yellow flame, made excellent fire starters. I am unsure how to go about finding this fatwood. I have tried to cut come myself from old pine stumps but it just wasn't the same. Does anyone know what kind of tree or stump to look for?

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« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2011, 09:55:30 AM »

Around here we cut the log into 8 in pieces. Then split the pieces until they are about the size of your finger or thumb. Fix your fire logs and put a few pieces of the fat lighter under it and light with a match. That stuff is too valuable to burn a piece of the log!



WAB



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« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2011, 11:07:06 AM »

Wab,  this is just how John does his lighter pine.  He picked up a nice big piece in the woods behind the house in the fall. 

Linhawk . I do not know how you find it or tell that it is lighter pine.

When we burned our massive broken pine limb from the immense bull pine, it went up in a few hours.  john said it was almost all lighter pine.  Wish we had known that before we set it on fire.
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bigcountry1009
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« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2011, 12:15:03 PM »

Well, I know most times it comes from a dead pine.  And again, there is a better chance of finding it in a dead tree that has rotted, but is still standing.  That's where I found mine.  You can tell by the smell, it'll be very strong, not just the normal pine smell.  I'm trying to use mine more efficiently.  I've normally just burned the whole thing.
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Clinton, SC
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linhawk
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« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2011, 01:49:18 PM »

Well, I know most times it comes from a dead pine.  And again, there is a better chance of finding it in a dead tree that has rotted, but is still standing.  That's where I found mine.  You can tell by the smell, it'll be very strong, not just the normal pine smell.  I'm trying to use mine more efficiently.  I've normally just burned the whole thing.

Thanks for the info. I cut the top 6" off an old pine stump. I then split it into small pieces. It worked okay but not like the stuff I was given.
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« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2011, 02:18:43 PM »

Well, I know most times it comes from a dead pine.  And again, there is a better chance of finding it in a dead tree that has rotted, but is still standing.  That's where I found mine.  You can tell by the smell, it'll be very strong, not just the normal pine smell.  I'm trying to use mine more efficiently.  I've normally just burned the whole thing.

Thanks for the info. I cut the top 6" off an old pine stump. I then split it into small pieces. It worked okay but not like the stuff I was given.


Most of the time the "fatlighter" is the heart of the log or stump. If you can find an old pine stump that the heart is sticking up, you can dig it out or pull it out. You need to let it dry for a year or so. Then it'll burn like gasoline!


WAB

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« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2011, 02:27:11 PM »

Well, I know most times it comes from a dead pine.  And again, there is a better chance of finding it in a dead tree that has rotted, but is still standing.  That's where I found mine.  You can tell by the smell, it'll be very strong, not just the normal pine smell.  I'm trying to use mine more efficiently.  I've normally just burned the whole thing.

Thanks for the info. I cut the top 6" off an old pine stump. I then split it into small pieces. It worked okay but not like the stuff I was given.


Most of the time the "fatlighter" is the heart of the log or stump. If you can find an old pine stump that the heart is sticking up, you can dig it out or pull it out. You need to let it dry for a year or so. Then it'll burn like gasoline!


WAB

I will let it dry next time. Thanks for the tip.


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« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2011, 05:15:21 PM »

We have plenty around here.  I can fill a truckload in the woods at any given time.  I keep this bucket by my fireplace.  Nothing better for starting a fire, but a little goes a long way, no need to burn the whole log.  This is the size I normally cut.  I have a hatchet that does the job well.  Our area is heavy in pine forests for timber.  It also used to be a major source of turpentine.  Referring to the turpentine industry, do you guys know what a cat face is?

Ralph
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I live on 20 acres in the Florida Big Bend, zone 8b.
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« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2011, 05:45:43 PM »

I do now,  I looked it up!!

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« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2011, 06:06:19 PM »

Used to find a lot of cat faces, not so much anymore.  Here's some photos.





Ralph
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I live on 20 acres in the Florida Big Bend, zone 8b.
Equipment: Yanmar 2010 diesel, Stevens Row Hippers, John Deere model 71 planter, Earthway planter, plow, box blade, bush hog, landscape rake, Yanmar tiller but too rocky to use it well, couple of 1960s gravely walk behinds
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« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2011, 06:14:17 PM »

I used to see trains with multiple cars loaded with pine stumps.  They were processed into gun powder.

Ralph
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I live on 20 acres in the Florida Big Bend, zone 8b.
Equipment: Yanmar 2010 diesel, Stevens Row Hippers, John Deere model 71 planter, Earthway planter, plow, box blade, bush hog, landscape rake, Yanmar tiller but too rocky to use it well, couple of 1960s gravely walk behinds
aebsmithcreek
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« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2011, 07:36:47 PM »

Ralph what makes it so hard to find cat faced pine is that they have had so much time to heal that the ones that are still standin are hard to pick out, i have walked by em several times without noticein the scars. for anyone lives in an area where they still clear cut pines the most productive way to gather fat lightered i found was goin onto a clear cut after they have started preparin it to be replanted and you can find em layin on top of the ground where they was pushed up by the equipment, i have loaded a pick up truck in about fifteen minutes doing this with three guys loadin and one drivin the truck. when lookin for lighter stumps look for that old stump that everything but the heart has rotted away, they are generaly the fatest it seems. another thing to look for on prescribed burns or behind forest fires is lightered poles that are still standin, just as the stumps it will be obvious that everything but the heart is gone. most the old fences in the old south was built with lightered poles and all the split rail fences as well. a freind of mine still has fence posts in service that his grandaddy set in the thirties. for outdoor fires we never burnt anything but fat lightered but like everything else the long arms of the feds have set limits on how much you can gather and it can only be gathered under permit so now we mix a little oak and dry pine with it, it just aint the same as standin around a good ole lightered fire.
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RALPH, one day when ya got the time to kill i can take ya to a long leaf it would take 2 or 3 of us to reach around that has grown through the hoop of a ox cart wheel, and if i can still find it there is a old cordouroy road that was built through a slough back when the turp camps was still here about 80 years ago.
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From a farming family but not a farmer trying to learn now so it can be passed on to my grandsons so they can see what fed our family as far back as I can trace. My wife Michelle and I live in a small rural community of maybe 30 households called smithcreek our only child a daughter Terri lives about a mile away with her husband who is a bee keeper. We have a JD 5105 4wd a 16" double bottom , 5'harrow covington 1 row planter 1 very old bush hog & 1 fairly new bush hog a boom pole & a push plow and plenty of shovels ,rakes,and hoes , and with the exception of the rakes , hoes shovel and push plow we are hoping to know how to use them by this time next year .SMITHCREEK COMMUNITY OF N.W. FLA/APALACHICOLA NAT'L FOREST- GOD'S COUNTRTY!!
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« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2011, 07:56:17 PM »

Sounds like a plan Earl.   

A lot of folks don't even know about how turpentine played into our history. 

Ralph
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I live on 20 acres in the Florida Big Bend, zone 8b.
Equipment: Yanmar 2010 diesel, Stevens Row Hippers, John Deere model 71 planter, Earthway planter, plow, box blade, bush hog, landscape rake, Yanmar tiller but too rocky to use it well, couple of 1960s gravely walk behinds
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« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2011, 08:40:53 PM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatwood

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I live on 20 acres in the Florida Big Bend, zone 8b.
Equipment: Yanmar 2010 diesel, Stevens Row Hippers, John Deere model 71 planter, Earthway planter, plow, box blade, bush hog, landscape rake, Yanmar tiller but too rocky to use it well, couple of 1960s gravely walk behinds
bigcountry1009
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« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2011, 07:48:56 AM »

I think there was a lot of turpentine harvesting around my area of SC and up in the Blue Ridge.  Never seen a cat face though to my knowledge.  I assume the fat wood is last place the resin that's used for turpentine is deposited in the tree.  Probly why it smells so strong.  Had a buddy give me a larger piece and it's actually quite pretty wood when split.
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Clinton, SC
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Looking to make grocery store trips a memory
TheCutNShootTiredGuy
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« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2011, 07:27:18 AM »

When I was 12 years old, my Dad and some other guys leased some property in the Navasota River bottom for a Deer Lease. The owner of the land, a Doctor, gave them permission to use an Old house on the property for a camp house. The old house was in bad shape. All the guys in the group worked in the construction trades. They all got together and remodeled that house on the inside. It looked Bad on the outside, but like new inside. My Dad built a wood burning heater out of a 55 gal. barrel and vented it properly. The heater was located in the, main room of the house. It would keep that whole house nice and warm.

One of the guys brought his new brother-in-law to the Deer lease one weekend. That guy had no hunting, or camping experience. The guy was a real greenhorn.
The first thing we would always do, when arriving at the Old house was to build a fire in the heater. Since everyone had gotten to the Deer lease early on this occasion, the heater was loaded with wood and lite and then everyone loaded up and we did a drive around the lease and put out corn for the next mornings hunt. Upon arriving back at the Old house, the New brother-in-law wanted to fit in and decided that stroking the heater with some wood  would be the thing he could do and try to fit in with the group. Nobody knew he had done this until the event happened. It was dark outside and everyone had started in the back door and we could hear what sounded like a jet taking off in the main room of the house. Everyone ran to investigate. That rooms lights were off but the room had a Big glow. That Barrel heater was vibrating up and down on it's legs. The barrel was cherry red all over and the room was so hot that it would take your breath away. The new brother-in-law had thrown a piece of lightered pine into the heater along with some other wood. That piece of lightered pine was about 30" long X approx. 8 or 10" round. That situation was a real eye opener for a 12 year old. That brother-in-law got a real scare and some education at the same time. He found out the hard way, what lightered pine was and what it would do. I always wished I had had a picture of that cherry red barrel heater glowing in the dark.  Grin
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