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Author Topic: Bell pepper yield  (Read 8574 times)
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FireMike
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« on: February 07, 2011, 08:55:55 PM »

How many peppers does a bell pepper plant produce? I've always seen post on how many LBS a plant will yield but never a count. I know its always different but give me you best guess. If one would use the right fertilezer, at the right time, with the  correct amount of water, How many?
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dutdut1981
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2011, 09:14:24 PM »

Welcome to the forum Mike Grin. We're like neighbors!!
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Zachary La
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2011, 09:25:35 PM »

A good healthy plant, that receives adequate water and fertilizing should yield around 8 or more bell peppers.  The size will vary too.  At most probably 12 bell peppers.  I can't wait to pick some fresh bell peppers this summer.
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2011, 09:30:42 PM »

i guess it depends on the bell, I planted juniper last year and had 13 or so on one plant at one time. Must have picked it a couple time after that fefore a storm killed them. What type do yall plant peach? Tbird, what say you, I know you count.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2011, 09:35:44 PM by dutdut1981 » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2011, 11:51:32 PM »

Welcome to the forum Mike.  I never count mine.  I start picking as I need them and as enough of them size up, I'll attack them for the freezer.  I do know the bell pepper counts are always much lower than any other kind.  They keep repeating until frost.
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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2011, 04:00:30 AM »

Welcome Mike, I'm not much of a pepper grower so I can't give you an answer. I might just try to grow them in pots standing in water this year to see if that helps.
"gene"
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2011, 04:38:52 AM »

I would guess that an average might be a dozen per year per plant?.....I've had some make more and some make less so I'm going with a dozen.

Also, since we're talking bout bell peppers....how many here stake they're plants?
I've lost a few too wet periods and the plants falling over so we started staking and tying like maters....works great.
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« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2011, 05:32:59 AM »

I like to use a 4' bamboo stick and sometimes more than one for staking peppers.  Even if they grow taller that's enough to keep them off the ground.
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« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2011, 08:11:55 AM »

I'm pretty sure that I got more than a dozen per plant last year over the whole season (until November frost).  I bought hybrid transplants from a local guy who has been selling plants for 50 years.  After the first flush of peppers, I just put a little bat guano (1-12-1) around each plant every couple of weeks or so....and wow, the peppers just kept coming!
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« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2011, 08:34:01 AM »

Seems I always got way more than 12 up until the 'sun scald' situation of last year.  I hope to not have that again.  My peppers are always so big i use tomato cages that you buy at the home store to hold them up.  they come out of the top of those, too. 

Gail
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« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2011, 09:00:11 AM »

I would guess that an average might be a dozen per year per plant?.....I've had some make more and some make less so I'm going with a dozen.

Also, since we're talking bout bell peppers....how many here stake they're plants?
I've lost a few too wet periods and the plants falling over so we started staking and tying like maters....works great.

I put tomato baskets around them just like mater plants.  Works well.  Also If I had to average a count per Plant I would guess 12 to 20 peppers per plant, depends on weather conditions.

Bob

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« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2011, 10:21:36 AM »

I've had some on the row loaded down and the plant right next to it make only a few.  If I'd keep count through the whole season it would probably be a couple of dozen, at least?

I keep saying each year I'm going to cage mine.  Maybe this is the year.   Grin

Donald
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« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2011, 11:08:02 AM »

I would guest about 3 dozen, but most of them
are small about the size of a tennis ball. They
May get a little larger early in the season.

I plant Calif. Wonder.

Mike
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Mike
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« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2011, 05:50:26 PM »

On the average I usually harvest about 14  good size peppers per plant. They are large and I usually stake them with some 1'2 inch conduit. I use strips of cloth to fasten them with.
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« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2011, 06:09:49 PM »

Pepperman come back and tell us what bell to plant for a good stuffer.  I get good numbers but they tend to be small and squatty.  This year I started Big Bertha, Chinese Giant, Orange Sun and Chocolate.  I wonder if I should remove some of the blooms to make them grow bigger.
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« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2011, 06:10:46 PM »

If I make any at all, it's a bunch. Kinda feast or famine. I learned last year that peppers don't do well in poor soil. So I'm gonna make sure that my potential contest entries are transplanted in some good stuff, whether it be in the garden or in a container.

Probably gonna go buy some T-posts so I can keep these monsters staked up ! Grin
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« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2011, 10:02:07 PM »

MHP ...  I'll have to use two T-post, one on each side of that 6 ft. cage to hold my peppers up.   Grin

Donald
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« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2011, 11:42:44 PM »

MHP ...  I'll have to use two T-post, one on each side of that 6 ft. cage to hold my peppers up.   Grin

Donald


LOL......that was funny when I first read it. Then I saw an image of this huge pepper plant that looked more like a fruit tree, with what appeared to be heads of cabbage hanging from it. Upon closer inspection, it was a new breed of bell pepper. When asked what kind of seed he had planted, the jolly ol' feller replied " Cajun Wonder !".  Grin
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« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2011, 12:07:13 AM »

Y'all clowns got me snortn my coffee.  Tomorrow I'm sharpening my chainsaw so it'll be ready for harvesting my peppers.
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MS Coast
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« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2011, 12:51:21 AM »

No I just coughed til my eyes bugged out and I thought I was gonna bust a blood vessel.  Maybe it's about like a dose of pepper spray.  I'm told that clears sinuses too.  If I could grow true bell peppers like I can hot peppers, I'd show y'all something.

My husband was a sailor and he said he never washed his coffee mug at work.  Of course I thought that was an outrage but... if you wet a paper towel with regular coffee and wipe out the cup it does remove any stain or buildup and it will look perfectly clean.  I live on coffee and have never had any gut problems so IMHO it's very therapeutic, especially in excessive quantities.
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« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2011, 07:53:48 AM »

  Tomorrow I'm sharpening my chainsaw so it'll be ready for harvesting my peppers.

Omg... I think I'm gonna enter another category. Between Donald's "Cajun Wonder" and that Bell Pepper/hybrid Poplar you're growing, I don't stand a chance.  Shocked Grin

I was gonna join the Arbor Day Foundation to get a discount on some trees I want to plant. I wonder if they are taking advance orders for Bell Pepper trees. Huh?  Grin
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« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2011, 08:51:42 AM »

I grew 8 bell pepper plants last year.  all but 2 did very well, but i had one "over achiever" at the beginning of the row (that got the most direct sunlight) that just got unbelievably huge. (in comparison to the other plants)  it was chin high (i'm 6' 2") and the trunk was approx. 2.5 inches thick.  i did not count the number of bell's i got from that plant or the others for that matter, but seemed to me that it kept on producing and growing all summer and fall. my guestimate would be conservative at atleast 2 1/2 dozen bells from just that one plant.  this plant was double the size of any other plant.  and the plant right next to it was one of the runts of the litter....  go figure.
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« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2011, 10:06:22 AM »

Tuttimato,
  I usually stuff red green and yellow peppers. The chocolate are to good and we just eat them cut up. Make sure you don't crowd your plants when planting and keep the weeds out. Mid way give them a little fertilizer and keep them watered. Good luck with your harvest .
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« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2011, 07:34:01 PM »

I planted some California Wonders on Jan 31 and haven't seen up pop up yet.  It will probably be a few more days....  So I helped them this evening when I found an old water-bed mattress heater mat.  I turned it down as low as it would go (70 degrees) set the jiffy tray right on top.  After reading the germination temps (http://www.cmg.colostate.edu/gardennotes/720.pdf) I may turn 'em up to 80. Cool



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« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2011, 08:10:38 PM »

I started 8 peppers on Jan 16. They are all up now, but it was slooow going. They are still tiny little seedlings. They are truly a warm weather plant. The ones I have growing right now in the GH were transplanted some time in late Nov I think. They are just now blooming good, and I see the first pepper thats about the size of a small marble. Slow growing, but they'll get there.

Bobby
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It is one thing to earn the money to put food on the table, it is yet another to produce the food itself.
Southern Virginia
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