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Author Topic: Kodiak Mustard -- Trying out unique Cover Crop  (Read 1234 times)
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ben
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« on: July 26, 2013, 03:14:03 AM »

I am going to plant some Kodiak Mustard this fall to see how it works.  Literature gives high praise.

Purchased some seeds last year but never got around to planting them.

Some quotes

"Kodiak Mustard is very unique cover crop.  Kodiak contains very high levels of glucosynolates, that will break down to form thiocyanates that can control nematodes and organisms which cause soil born diseases."

SETEX_Gardener--Curtis if I recall you have a nematode problem--might be worth a try in one of your beds.  BTW How you doing since your surgeries.  Let us hear from you.

Kodiak is not a mix or a blend it is all Brassica juncea, the species that has the correct type of glucosinolate to kill disease causing organisms.  When incorporated into the the soil, the green tissues will release volatile compounds, allyl isothiocyanates as a metabolite from the reaction between 2 propenyl glucosinolate and myrosinase.

"Kodiak has a higher concentration (more per gram of plant tissue) of glucosinolates and produces more plant biomass that previous varieties.  Kodiak's organic matter breaks faster compared to standard cover crops."

"Kodiak can cycle large amounts nutrients so that your save your residual nitrogen.  Kodiak also improves water penetration and suppresses weeds while it grows."

Tbird  What is this???
"Seed production of Kodiak are is restricted in accordance with the Plant Variety Protection Act."

Can be planted year round in mild climates.  Fall is best.

15-20 pounds per acre
5 - 9 pounds     $4.43 per pound
10 - 24 pounds $3.83 per pound



Look at size of plant== see cap on ground.

Ben
« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 03:29:38 AM by ben » Logged

Northwest Louisiana zone borderline 8a-8b
tbird
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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2013, 08:18:57 AM »




Tbird  What is this???
"Seed production of Kodiak are is restricted in accordance with the Plant Variety Protection Act."

Ben


  The PVPA of 1970 simply is a way of protecting the plant developer's rights to "own" the rights to a plant for 25 years after development.  In other words you are not supposed to keep and plant the seeds from this plant.  You are supposed to buy them each time you want to plant it.   Wink




  This is a most interesting article on using Brassicas and Mustards for fumigating soils.  It is a very in depth article and will shed a lot of light on their use beyond advertising information.   Wink


http://www.sare.org/Learning-Center/Books/Managing-Cover-Crops-Profitably-3rd-Edition/Text-Version/Nonlegume-Cover-Crops/Brassicas-and-Mustards
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klwillis
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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2013, 09:45:20 AM »

Thanks for sharing. That is a very interesting article "T".

I make it a point now to grow the Brassicas, Mustards and Alliums each year.

What's good for the soil is also good for our own stomach as well. Smiley




Tbird  What is this???
"Seed production of Kodiak are is restricted in accordance with the Plant Variety Protection Act."

Ben


  The PVPA of 1970 simply is a way of protecting the plant developer's rights to "own" the rights to a plant for 25 years after development.  In other words you are not supposed to keep and plant the seeds from this plant.  You are supposed to buy them each time you want to plant it.   Wink




  This is a most interesting article on using Brassicas and Mustards for fumigating soils.  It is a very in depth article and will shed a lot of light on their use beyond advertising information.   Wink


http://www.sare.org/Learning-Center/Books/Managing-Cover-Crops-Profitably-3rd-Edition/Text-Version/Nonlegume-Cover-Crops/Brassicas-and-Mustards
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How far you go in life depends on you being tender with the young,
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tbird
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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2013, 10:05:13 AM »

Another good link explaining Brassicas as soil fumigants. 


http://www.columbiapublications.com/onionworld/february2006/brassicabiofum.htm
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18.25 Acres in Central West Louisiana | USDA Zone 8b

Isaiah 66:22, 23, 24

Many, LA


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klwillis
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« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2013, 10:30:27 AM »

This passage explains why minimal tilling is best for long-term soil health:

"Your tillage method is an important consideration when using cover crops to build soil, because tillage will affect the rate of organic matter accumulation. It is difficult to build up organic matter under conventional tillage regimes. Tillage speeds up organic matter decomposition by exposing more surface area to oxygen, warming and drying the soil, and breaking residue into smaller pieces with more surfaces that can be attacked by decomposers. Like fanning a fire, tillage rapidly “burns up” or “oxidizes” the fuel, which in this case is organic matter. The resulting loss of organic matter causes the breakdown of soil aggregates and the poor soil structure often seen in overtilled soil. "

It makes so much sense, but we are often told to mix organic material back into the soil - better to let it lie on the surface and
for the fungal and bacterial organisms to break material down passively, releasing nutrients back gently into the soil.

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Kevin Willis, VP/CIO/CTO
Health Information Technology Software Consultant
Nexus Health-Care

Bite-Size Gardens
"One Bite and We Gotcha! .  .  .
  Your Small-Space Water-Wise Gardening Experts"

The ultimate goal of farming is not the growing of crops, but the cultivation and perfection of human beings.
—MASANOBU FUKUOKA


How far you go in life depends on you being tender with the young,
compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the
weak and the strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these.

—GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER
LP
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« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2013, 03:03:47 PM »

Thanks for posting this Ben.
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ben
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« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2013, 04:38:34 PM »

Tbird--Thanks-- I knew you would know.  Thanks for the other links.
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tbird
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2013, 07:59:22 PM »

  You know ben,  in the not too distant future I think we will all be using cover crops for soil building, disease prevention, fertilizer addition and moisture retention.  Things using energy to produce them, ship them or use them are going to get stupidly expensive and alternatives will be needed.  Cover crops are a sure fire method to do all the good things in your garden and you can eat a lot of them to boot!   Grin


  Since you have started this thread I have been researching mustards and Brassicas almost every free monent of today.  Brassica Juncea is "Brown" mustard.  You will notice that Brown Mustard or Brassica Juncea s a commonly grown garden variety mustard that also goes by the name "Florida Broadleaf Mustard."

  I have checked this with he USDA, WIKI, many seed suppliers and some State/Private University Ag Depts.    Wink


  Now the coincidental part.  Today a long time friend (he and his wife mover up here with us after Katrina and we worked together at Domino for 20 years) came by with his daughter and 3 grand kids.  They fished, chased my chickens around and played with the 6 dogs.  While the grand kids were occupied with a big catfish he gave me a packet of many herbs, spice and medicinal plant seeds.  So I looked though this pack and there were at least 48 different packs of seeds.  In there was a pack of "Brassica Niger" or Black Mustard seeds.  I have wanted to get some and now I have them.  That is when I went to look for brown mustard seeds and found they are Brassica Juncea.  While looking for that I found that it goes under many names that we would recognize. Also Yellow Mustard is made from White Mustard seed which is in the Brassica family but considered a Sinapis.  Specifically White Mustard being S. Alba.

  BTW,  the mustard seed that Jesus referred to is believed to be the Black Mustard seed which is the smallest of the mustard seeds at 1mm average size.   Wink
« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 08:39:28 PM by tbird » Logged

Barking Dog Farm

18.25 Acres in Central West Louisiana | USDA Zone 8b

Isaiah 66:22, 23, 24

Many, LA


Enough Farm Equipment to Run a Small Farm!


Click for weather forecast
WKyGardener
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« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2013, 10:46:14 AM »

ben is that mustard six feet tall my guess?

I would think that would be hard to till in with my troybilt horse tiller. I am going to sow some mustard, kale, and turnips seed with some annual rye grass this fall as a cover crop for winter just to get bare soil covered before winter sets in this year. I don't think what I will sow will get that tall thou, at least I hope not.  Grin Grin
Jim
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