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Author Topic: Two Week Old Taters Today!  (Read 1748 times)
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tbird
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« on: February 04, 2013, 05:14:29 PM »

These are the red LaSoda taters I planted two weeks ago today.  They were from my June Harvest last year and had eyed up really nice.  Some of the eyes were actually 2-1/2" long and there were at least 3 to 6 eyes on each tater.  I planted each tater whole.

As almost everyone that bought seed taters this year will attest,  the quality is awful it appears nationwide.  I have already had 3 new seed taters I purchased in Mid January develop black soft spots and a few others are showing mildew spots.  Certified my butt.  This is the type of thing "Conspiracy Theories" are written about!   Grin

So when I do plant my "Certified" seed taters this year,  they will be at least 100' away from these and in a section that has not, and probably never will grow taters again.  In 10 days on Valentine's Day if these seed taters look any worse than now,  they are getting planted in the burn pit.   Sad


At least the ones in the pics are growing well and looked great for taters sitting in a tray in the house for almost 8 months!   Grin

This harvest I am picking 15# of my best looking taters and putting them aside for seed next year.  I am not going to buy bad quality seed taters.   Wink








« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 05:16:01 PM by tbird » Logged

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AllisCA
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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2013, 05:22:10 PM »

That truely amazing to me. Last yr I planted on April 1st and it took nearly a month for mine to barely show. You plant in the middle of winter and their up in 2 weeks looking good. WOW!
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Amanda,OH
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2013, 05:38:51 PM »

That truely amazing to me. Last yr I planted on April 1st and it took nearly a month for mine to barely show. You plant in the middle of winter and their up in 2 weeks looking good. WOW!

I've had the same trouble with purchased seed.  My grandpa always has potatoes left over and boy do they come up fast. 

Now, I don't always have that problem with purchased seed stock, but the last few years it has taken forever for them to come through the ground.  Last year it took a month and a half.  I planted two 40ft. rows each of Kennebec, Red Pontiac, Yukon Gold, Red LaSoda and Russets. 

With the drought and all the none of them produced as they should.  I ended up, numbers wise, with more Russets but they were all less than 4 inches long x 1 1/2 inches.  The numbers of Kennebecs wan't much at all, but had a few average size taters.  The Yukon Gold produced better than they ever have for me as far as size, but I'm not impressed with the numbers at all...ever, good year or bad year. 

While production was way low on the red varieties that I planted, I did have some really big red taters...even my first planting of Red LaSoda's was impressive size wise.  Still numbers were low with the drought.

Over the years I've mostly planted Kennebecs, but for what ever reason they started not doing so well.  So, about 10 years ago I starting planting Red Pontiacs and they've always, except for last year, produced extraordinarily well for me, both in size and numbers.  That said, I wanted to try the LaSodas this past year and they did well enough without too much water that on a good year I think they too will impress me.

Tbird, that sure looks awful wet right now.  Shouldn't effect you much if they're all up though.  I hope not at least.
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Bill
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2013, 07:32:38 PM »

Tom,

I planted a 30 foot row of the red potato and a 30 foot row of carrots with shallots around the edges of the carrots. As of this note, I have a soft rain going which should be just what the doctor ordered.

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David
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2013, 07:49:52 PM »

 I'll have my 20lbs in the dirt on Thurs/ Friday ... Moms always come first .so I was discing her garden today. That Waning moon waits for no man.


         Charlie
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tbird
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2013, 08:41:49 PM »

  Remember all,  these taters were sitting in a tray in the house since May and started to get eyes around October,  so when I say they had big eyes when I planted them, I mean B-I-G eyes!  Some of them started breaking ground in only 4 days.  That was strictly because the eyes were so well developed.  Considering when we get seed taters here mid January, until we plant, mid February,  there isn't time to develop eyes that large.  Last year it took 35 days for my first tater to break ground and only 25% grew.  There was entirely too much water from rain.  The year before it took 42 days to break ground and when they did, they all broke ground within two days of each other.  That was a drought year and my best tater year of the 6 years here.

  From now on I keep my own taters from seed and I let them eye up real well.  I am also going to plant mid to late January instead of February 14th.  If the weather gets real cold I will mulch heavily with hay.    Wink
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 09:05:00 PM by tbird » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2013, 09:05:50 PM »

Smiley   Smiley  Smiley     judy
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2013, 09:29:03 PM »

Tbird--Now that you are caught up, you can come to Lafayette and you and Kevin can finish plowing up this yard!!!!  Teach him to build a proper levee too!!!  Give Nancy a hug for me!!!
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« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2013, 11:15:07 PM »

I agree with ya T; It's time to start saving back a bunch of small taters when they're dug; and put em up for winter. I believe they'll be MUCH better quality than what we received this year.
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« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2013, 11:36:23 PM »

But you guys won't be planting certified seed.   Roll Eyes  Grin  That kills me ha ha.  Maybe there's something to I suppose.  I've always read (rarely have I done it...once or twice maybe) to cover them with sulfer powder, especially if you cut them, to keep disease from bothering them.  Never really noticed a difference.

I've also heard people say that when you cut them you should allow the cuts to heal a bit for a few days, or a week, but I've never done that either and I've mostly had real good luck with my potatoes.  Not saying my crop couldn't benefit and be better, rather, that we've always cut the potatoes that need cutting and planted the same day...sometime around St. Patrick's day for us here in sw Ohio.
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Bill
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« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2013, 12:49:38 AM »

 An old farm lady that had planted taters for 75 years told me to roll them in fireplace ash after you cut them.  I do and I never have problems. 
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2013, 06:28:36 AM »

Hi T-

Man, those must of been BIG eyes.  Like everybody else posted, it took mine about five weeks to get to that size last year.  Looking good!
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« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2013, 08:10:30 AM »

Mine arent up yet, but the avg time for popping out of ground has always been about 3 weeks.
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« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2013, 09:30:11 AM »

An old farm lady that had planted taters for 75 years told me to roll them in fireplace ash after you cut them.  I do and I never have problems. 
A buddy of mine said to flour them with sulfur. Wonder if that does the same thing.
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« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2013, 10:40:28 AM »

I coat mine in Sulphur and let them set about a week then planted. Some folks I know use Lime instead of sulphur though. Not sure why....

Curtis
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« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2013, 05:55:07 PM »

An old farm lady that had planted taters for 75 years told me to roll them in fireplace ash after you cut them.  I do and I never have problems. 
A buddy of mine said to flour them with sulfur. Wonder if that does the same thing.

  Yeah Allis,  I think they both do the same thing.  Ash is generally heat sterilized, high in Potassium and other salts so it desiccates the tater surface, provides some initial antiseptic action and acts as a sealant to prevent things from attacking the fresh tater core.  The way I see it, sulfur does eggs zackly the same thing!     Grin  Grin  Grin

  Thing is I have a fireplace so ash is in abundance!  I make alkali water from it too!   Wink
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« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2013, 06:03:48 PM »

Tbird, I was surprised to see that you plant your potatoes on the flat rather than in a somewhat hipped row.  I get so much rain that I have to have mine on an elevated row.  Just got mine (250 ft) planted before our most recent rain (yesterday afternoon).  I too was disappointed that these "certified" seed potatoes had a few dry rot spots.  I cut the spots out but it concerns me nevertheless.
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« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2013, 06:17:39 PM »

  My garden DF is in a relatively flat field that tilts toward my pond.  I always plant my tater rows on the highest ridges.  The way the water flows I can keep about 75% of my field drained pretty well in a moderate to higher than moderate rainfall.  I also plant flat to give me ground clearance for my tractor first time I pull up the soil.  Second time it is hoes, rakes and pulling soil up by hand. 
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« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2013, 07:18:17 PM »

 I have high hopes for a good Potato harvest this year . With a little help from 10 10
10 and some help from the Man Up Yonder (Pointing UP)
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« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2013, 12:42:10 PM »

Quote
Thing is I have a fireplace so ash is in abundance!
I heat my house with 2 wood stoves that go round the clock from Nov-March. Got plenty of ash myself and right now it all get thrown on the field. My stoves are real efficient so I only go through 2-4 cords a season. I have a buddy with a wood boiler that goes through 15 cords a season.
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« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2013, 12:52:18 PM »

  I wish I could use the ash in my field,  but with very high (K) Potassium and High (P) Phosphorus in my garden now anything I do not need is wood ash.   Wink  It is still good to make lime water for treating corn to make grits, making washing/cleaning solutions, and to make soap so I keep it in a waterproof wooden bin to be taken out when needed.  If I ever get that P-K down in the garden I may add some, especially if the pH dives too.   Wink

 
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« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2013, 09:17:35 AM »

  As of this morning there were 37 of 40 taters planted sprouted.  Not bad for old taters!  I am seriously considering NOT planting the seed taters I bought this year because of their low quality.  I figure if the inspectors missed the bad spots and poor quality they might have missed the harder to spot and more problematical disease parts too!   Angry
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« Reply #22 on: February 07, 2013, 11:37:22 AM »

I bought some seed taters last week and the taters look fine except they are a little bigger than I like.

Bob
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« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2013, 07:00:19 PM »

Those taters are looking pretty good.  Up here? I got nothing but snow, snow, and more snow. Needless to say, it will be a good 8 weeks before I can even think about planting potatoes.

Good luck with them this year!
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« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2013, 07:46:05 PM »

 My garden DF is in a relatively flat field that tilts toward my pond.  I always plant my tater rows on the highest ridges.  The way the water flows I can keep about 75% of my field drained pretty well in a moderate to higher than moderate rainfall.  I also plant flat to give me ground clearance for my tractor first time I pull up the soil.  Second time it is hoes, rakes and pulling soil up by hand.  

I plant my taters flat as well. By doing this it makes it easier to pull dirt to them and allow them to put on shoots and form taters in the mounds pulled to them. If you plant on high rows here it gets so dry that the roots die out and you don't make anything.

I planted two weeks ago tomorrow and I have taters up about two inches. Same as T-Bird, I had taters left over from last year sitting on a table in my shop. They had sprouts about an inch long all over them.

Curtis, my dad uses lime on his. He swears it keeps them from rotting. I don't use anything on mine but my ground is much sandier than his and I have never had an issue with rotting.

« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 07:48:40 PM by Texan » Logged

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