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Author Topic: Multiplying Onions Bolting  (Read 2582 times)
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tbird
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« on: January 28, 2013, 10:29:20 PM »

  Back on October 20 of last year I happen to run into SETEX Gardener (Curtis) in Hamburg, LA.   Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin   

  Anyway, he gave me some multiplying onions, since I did something stupid that will remain forever unknown, as mine were lost.  I planted them about a week later just before Halloween.  Well today I went out and saw almost all of them have one or two flower spikes coming up.  I am just going to let them bolt, flower and maybe I can collect some seeds.  This crop of onions will be strictly for sets to plant next October so I can build my stock back up to harvest numbers of a thousand or so.  I love to pickle the little onions and use them like Pearl Onions.  I used to plant about 150 or so each fall and harvest about 6 or 8 to each one planted.  Easy to grow and very easy to harvest, peel and process. 

  Thanks again Curtis,  the onions are doing fine!   Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin
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« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2013, 04:47:30 AM »

tbird,

I planted out some green onions bottoms that I bought from the store back in October.  Now, I have some regular bunching onions that I grew from seed and planting these bottoms was more of a trial than anything.  But, anyway, the bottoms are now about 2 inches in diameter and maybe 2 feet tall.  They really look more like leeks than scallions.  I was messing around yesterday and I noticed that some of these are bolting.   

I may try to get some seed and see what grows from the seed.  I figure the worst that can happen is the seed won't germinate or grow true.  At best I will have a pretty good variety of onions to grow from seed.
Tim
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« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2013, 09:37:18 AM »

Hey T,  I grow both Yellow Multipliers and Green Mountain Multipliers.  The Green Mountains are much better and bigger.  They were created by growing the seeds from yellow multipliers out and making careful selections by Kelly Winterton.  Mine flowered this year and I saved seed from them.  In the link there is a picture of my daughter standing in front of my Green Mountain Multiplier patch.  I don't have nearly enough, but when I do, I might stop growing most other kinds of onions.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jnqst7-9YfWFovhqjARtcZZVJC0TPzKsow_5mdAwnyA/edit?hl=en_US
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« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2013, 01:55:31 PM »

Longhornrancher,

I want to say thank you for providing that link.  My grandfather grew potato onions in our family for 40 years or more before he let something happen to his supply.  I don't know the story behind it, but we've been looking for a supply for quite a long time now.

I've sent an email to Kelly for some seeds, bulbs, or anything he might have left for stock.  I hope he still has something.

We'll be celebrating grandpa's 90th on Feb. 7th (birthday is Feb. 10) and I'd love to let him know that I've gotten some bulbs or seed.  I think that'll be tickle him quite well.

Grandpa has always eaten onions like most people would eat an apple.  If it's a sweet onion you might a well not even hand it to him.  The hotter the onion is the better he likes it.  I have fond memories of seeing grandpa walk out the door and grab a handful of onions and place them in his work coat pocket.  Every church night you could almost bank on being able to smell the onions on grandma and grandpa as they walked by to go to their church pew Smiley ... ha ha.

I hope I can find another supply if this one all out.
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« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2013, 02:29:54 PM »

I raised Evergreen Multiplying onions from seed 3 years ago. They were very easy to germinate, grow and were very tasty little onions. I made the mistake of planting too many and they almost took over my garden! The next year I planted bulbs and they went to seed in early spring. When I plant them again, I will plant from seed.
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« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2013, 03:49:31 PM »

Thanks for posting that link LHR.  I'm astonished at the size of all of them.  Never known of a multiplying onion developing a bulb.  Always something new to learn.  I did get Ishikuro scallions to make seeds but it took them 18 months from seeds.  I didn't get any flowers on my Red Creoles last year so last fall, I replanted some small ones, like sets, and it will be interesting to see if they flower this year.  I think it's a great idea for everybody to have some kind of private stock they can depend on.
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« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2013, 04:14:47 PM »

Hey T,  I grow both Yellow Multipliers and Green Mountain Multipliers.  The Green Mountains are much better and bigger.  They were created by growing the seeds from yellow multipliers out and making careful selections by Kelly Winterton.  Mine flowered this year and I saved seed from them.  In the link there is a picture of my daughter standing in front of my Green Mountain Multiplier patch.  I don't have nearly enough, but when I do, I might stop growing most other kinds of onions.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jnqst7-9YfWFovhqjARtcZZVJC0TPzKsow_5mdAwnyA/edit?hl=en_US

Is she a cutie! And I think I'd be growing those myself If I had them!!
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« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2013, 05:49:14 PM »

Thank you.  I hope to have enough in a couple of years to start sharing them.  You may not like them though.  They are not like the super sweet onions we know.  These things are STRONG. 
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« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2013, 06:04:23 PM »

At least for the type of potato onions my grandpa used to grow, the word STRONG emphasized in capitol letters would be a perfect description.  They used to make my eyes water just looking at them.  I have to admit though, they did add flavor to dishes that you just can't get from a sweet onion.

Dad said when he used to work with grandpa he'd hear grandpa's belly rumblin' after eatin' one of those onions and it sounded like two cats fighting.  He asked grandpa one day if his stomach was bothering him when his gut was makin' that racket and grandpa said, "don't reckon I've ever had a belly ache".   

I tried egyptian top-sets once a long time ago, but I didn't have much luck with them.
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« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2013, 06:30:39 PM »

Why dont Ya'll let the bolting green onions die back and dig up the bulbs, let them dry and plant them again.  I always have green onions.  I never even seen a seed for green onions.  I have been doing this for thirty years.
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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2013, 06:52:00 PM »

David,  Multiplying Onions don't generally go to seed.  It used to be a rare event.  It is happening more and more.  I got my Yellow Potato (Multipliers) from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.  They grow to about the size of a smallish onion and divide underground.  That is how they reproduce by asexual division.  Over the years it is speculated that due to virus they have gotten smaller.  They have all the genes in their genetic code to do all sorts of things if you are able to get seed.  If you grow that seed out for a few generations you may find something much better than you can get from SESE.  That is what Kelly W. did.  He now has the Green Mountains which are white, a brown variety, and a red variety.  I only have the white, but I will sow my seed this year and hope to get a red variety.  With my Yellow Tater Onions, I will eat the biggest in the bunch that forms under ground and spread out and replant the little ones.  With the Green Mountains I am trying to replant all of them, but they taste so good in stews.  

They really are neat onions, store for a year, and were a staple on just about every homestead a hundred years ago.  I have grown many different types of onions and for me these (tater onions, aka Multipliers) are much more hardy than regular onions.  I also really like that they reproduce without having to sow seed.  

I replant mine in the Fall and harvest early to mid summer.  

For you guys that mechanically cultivate, I think that they do better in beds without mechanical cultivation, verses rows with cultivation as they spread out and have very shallow roots.  I use leaf mulch for weed control in my beds.


I hope you do not feel that I have hijacked your thread Mr. Bird.  I am very fond of perennial alliums.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2013, 07:02:48 PM by LonghornRancher » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2013, 07:10:23 PM »

Thanks Longhorn, thats why I am here, to learn.

I did think that when they bolt or make a flower there were probably seeds being produced.  We just never saved
the seeds and just dug the bulbs.

There are wild onions that grow here and they make a flower although it looks a little different than the cultivated onions flowers.  I am sure they produce seeds.  They are a more bitter than the cultivated onions but I would thinks that is where they come form.
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« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2013, 05:47:29 PM »

Gang,

A good discussion and the onion link is very good.

Moderator: does this qualify to be moved to the "how to" part of the board?

David
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David
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« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2013, 07:24:46 PM »

Gang,

A good discussion and the onion link is very good.

Moderator: does this qualify to be moved to the "how to" part of the board?

David


   How to?  We have a How To part of this board?    Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin


  It never ceases to amaze me how a simple observation can turn into a discussion on this forum!  Ya gotta luv this place!   Grin Grin Grin Grin
« Last Edit: January 30, 2013, 07:28:19 PM by tbird » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2013, 08:22:30 PM »

I thought this WAS the how to board.
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« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2013, 08:31:06 PM »

I thought this WAS the how to board.


   Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin


  After completely reading the Onion Booklet I am impressed.  I also am interested in trying to develop my own type of Tater Unyun!   Grin  I hope the bolting that is now in progress actually results in a True Seed.  I guess it does or doesn't depending on the plant itself.  I am going to do more research on this topic and hope I can find more Unyun Aficionados!  You never know what you can learn until you try and learn it!   Grin
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« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2013, 08:08:08 AM »

Davidx357, when you replant after letting the bulb dry, do the onions bolt again?
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« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2013, 11:26:03 AM »

Why dont Ya'll let the bolting green onions die back and dig up the bulbs, let them dry and plant them again.  I always have green onions.  I never even seen a seed for green onions.  I have been doing this for thirty years.

  Green onion seed is at Fred's, Family Dollar, Save A Center, Wal-Mart, and almost anywhere selling seed.  I have always seen it for 35 years under the name "Lisbon White Bunching Onions."   Ferry Morse, American Seed, etc. all sell them.  I had a few packs that went out of date.  I never did try to grow them.  Figure I must have tossed them and can't send up a pic.   Smiley


  I buy those little packs of 80 white onions bulbs at Wal-Mart each year for $1.99 and stick those in the ground about 2" or so deep.  In 3 weeks you have green onions.  I buy two bags and I have 160 or so green onions a year.  They keep good in the bottom of the refrigerator.   Wink
« Last Edit: January 31, 2013, 11:28:28 AM by tbird » Logged

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« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2013, 11:31:52 AM »

Bamadoug,

Eventually they will bolt a gain like normal.  But you get a crop first.   I generally plant them twice a year, spring and fall.  I have found the more you pull and replant, the longer before they bolt.
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« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2013, 05:05:36 PM »

Thanks David, I will try that this year.
My wife really likes to use the green onions for cooking.
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« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2013, 11:05:20 AM »

Wish he wasn't sold out! Anyone have some to sell?
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« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2013, 05:14:40 PM »

  Here's a pic of a few of the bolting Multipliers.  Every onion has a flower spike.  I hope they seed up.  If they do i will share some to see how we can grow them.  Also when the onions are harvested,  I will dry them for a few weeks and then replant to be harvested again in the fall.   Wink
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« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2013, 01:50:25 PM »

As an update for an old thread...

My bulbs haven't faired so well.  They were doing fine until I hit them with Peter's triple20, which I thought I have had grabbed the regular Miracle Grow...of which I didn't really need because they were being grown in Miracle Grow potting mix.  They've been mostly brown ever since and got no bigger hardly than they were when I planted them. Stupid mistake on my part.

My tater onions from seed are doing well, even though I started them much later than when I recieved them.  They're about the size of a quarter, and I just transplanted them into a big tree pot with a soil-less mix, a Miracle grow mix that's been in the pots for at least 2 years now, so the fertilizer should be gone.  The seed onions seem to doing fine.  I hope they make it.
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Bill
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« Reply #23 on: July 18, 2013, 04:37:38 PM »

My gosh, that is one sweet little girl! SO CUUTE, love the head of curls.

OK does anyone have some bulbs to sell?
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« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2013, 05:19:29 PM »

I must have missed this thread first time around.  My interest has definitely been aroused.  I was under the impression multiplyers were a southern thing.    Hey Longhorn, do you have long blond hair as pretty as your daughter? Cheesy  I only ask cause I'm balding. Angry
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