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Author Topic: Installing hydraulics on a Farmall B  (Read 1503 times)
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ACrickRunsThroughIt
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« on: November 01, 2012, 05:53:14 AM »

I'm taking the Woods L59 mower off the Farmall B this fall, as I have gone to a newer and smaller unit for mowing the lawn. Though the B, at age 65, is old enough to retire, I'd like to put it to work powering a trailer-type log splitter. What that's going to take is a hydraulic system, which the B does not have. Do any of you engineers and tinkerers have experience with putting hydraulics on a Farmall B? I've heard about putting a pump on the front of the tractor and running it off the fan belt, putting a pump on the rear of the tractor and running it off the PTO or the flat-belt pulley, and putting a pump on the left side of the tractor and running it off the electrical system, which is first converted to 12 volts. Could any of you expound on any of these methods? Or add another option to the mix?
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1948 Farmall Cub with corn planter, plow, disc, etc.; 1965 Cub Lo-Boy with 42-inch Woods mower; Planet Jr., Hoss and Earthway seeders; Planet Jr. wheel hoes; Mantis and Troy-Bilt tillers; Garden Way Super Tomahawk Chipper Shredder and the 1947 Farmall B that taught me how to cultivate corn at age 10.

"People who count their chickens before they are hatched, act very wisely, because chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them accurately."
-- Oscar Wilde
AllisCA
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« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2012, 02:50:57 PM »

I have for yrs split my wood with a tractor powered splitter. I highly recommend you use a PTO powered pump. Something most people don't think about when it comes to this kind of project is you are using way more engine than you need so the only economy you can get is from being able to run the engine slow. A Prince PTO pump 22gpm will allow you do just that. They are pricey at about 400.00 but is is the best solution. If you decide not to go with the Prince you could run something else but it will need to be geared up faster as most pumps put out rated volume at much more than 540rpm. Either way the aim is to have good volume with slow engine rpm. Keeps fuel economy up and noise down. I really like my tractor powered splitter. It moves at 4sec full cycle speed (4"cyl.)if I want it too or slower by just pulling the throttle back.
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Amanda,OH
ACrickRunsThroughIt
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« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2012, 05:32:21 AM »

Thanks, AllisCa, for that recommendation. I do think that a PTO-powered pump is the best way to go, except that there may be times I'd want to use the hydraulics for something else and might also need the PTO at the same time. But then there is also the belt pulley conveniently situated right next to the PTO. I found the Prince unit on the Internet and it is indeed pricey. Then I went to Craigslist and found this ad for a Char-Lynn pump.

http://eauclaire.craigslist.org/grd/3286270104.html

Do you know anything about Char-Lynn?

Thanks for your help.

Joe
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1948 Farmall Cub with corn planter, plow, disc, etc.; 1965 Cub Lo-Boy with 42-inch Woods mower; Planet Jr., Hoss and Earthway seeders; Planet Jr. wheel hoes; Mantis and Troy-Bilt tillers; Garden Way Super Tomahawk Chipper Shredder and the 1947 Farmall B that taught me how to cultivate corn at age 10.

"People who count their chickens before they are hatched, act very wisely, because chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them accurately."
-- Oscar Wilde
AllisCA
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« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2012, 08:10:14 AM »

I used to have one exactly like that one. The ad spells it out what they were sold for. 2 problems with that unit. One is 12gpm will be at 540 pto. You will need that much with your tractor near idle. And 2nd that's probably only a 1200psi pump. You need high volume and high pressure to make this all work. The Prince can be rigged for quick on/off like mine so your only tying up the pto when your splitting. I have 3 special brackets made depending on which tractor I use the splitter. Its been on my Farmall H, AllisCA, and John Deere 5400. Every commercial 3pt splitter sold today for 3pt use uses the Prince PTO pump. On my 5400 diesel runnig at 1200rpm I use no more or possibly less fuel than a 6hp Briggs screaming its guts out to do the same work at a 4th the speed. And BTW you won't have the second stage but you don't need it with all the power.
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Amanda,OH
ACrickRunsThroughIt
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« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2012, 04:02:38 AM »

Thanks for the education, AllisCA. It's going to take me awhile to digest all the info. The only "learning" I had on the subject was anecdotal -- conversations about taking a pump off a boneyard combine or some such thing. I'm going to start searching Craigslist for a used Prince pump.
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1948 Farmall Cub with corn planter, plow, disc, etc.; 1965 Cub Lo-Boy with 42-inch Woods mower; Planet Jr., Hoss and Earthway seeders; Planet Jr. wheel hoes; Mantis and Troy-Bilt tillers; Garden Way Super Tomahawk Chipper Shredder and the 1947 Farmall B that taught me how to cultivate corn at age 10.

"People who count their chickens before they are hatched, act very wisely, because chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them accurately."
-- Oscar Wilde
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