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Author Topic: Blackberry cuttings  (Read 548 times)
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Oldiron
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« on: July 28, 2012, 06:30:56 AM »

OK I have some Apache blackberries that have decided to take off and grow here in the last month or so. To the point where I need to do some pruning to keep them under control.

Now these are two plants and I really want more. I love blackberry preserves, cobbler so on. It's the middle of summer, central Texas, hotter then the hinges of hell. Do I want to try starting cuttings now? Wait till fall? Winter? 

When I take those cuttings do I do anything other than apply rooting hormone, stick them in dirt and water?
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" An expert is somebody who has killed at least 10,000 plants" Bob Webster. I ain't there yet but I'm workin' on it!

A few miles north of San Antonio Texas

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scottstephenson
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2012, 02:26:58 PM »

When taking cuttings from Grapes, Which it should be about the same with Blackberry,  In early spring we cut the twigs with 6-8 buds and dip them in rooting hormone and then stick half of the buds in the ground and have the other half above ground.  I have also tried sticking the entire cutting under ground with 80% survival rate.  Be sure to keep moist until established.   
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2012, 02:28:54 PM »

My old garden book says blackberries can be propagated by division of crowns, sucker plants or with root cuttings. It says take cutting in fall or early spring from roots about the size of a pencil, cut in sections 4 to 8 inches long,plant in a shallow trench and cover with 3 to 4 inches of soil.  Several new plants will sprout from each cutting and usually have a  much better root system than sucker plants.  I would probably just divide some of your plants with a shovel in the fall and transplant them where you want them.
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Oldiron
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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2012, 02:47:55 PM »

I had to do some pruning to keep the ally open. Figured I'd give it a shot. I could either try to root them or they were going straight into the compost pile.
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" An expert is somebody who has killed at least 10,000 plants" Bob Webster. I ain't there yet but I'm workin' on it!

A few miles north of San Antonio Texas

John Deere LA115
Western Auto Atlas front tine tiller
Shovels, forks, hoes, and other implements of destruction
texasfarmer
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« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2012, 03:01:16 PM »

The Apache is patented by U.Ark and when you purchase plants a royalty is included in purchase price.I dont know if they enforce it against home gardeners.I would suggest buying your plants from a licenced propagator such as Simmons berry farm,Mountainburg  Ak,They have a nice website.The best way to propagate is to take a long mature cane,kink the cane about a foot from tip,stick it in a hole 4 to 6 inch deep,cover with soil leaving the tip uncovered.Do not cut the cane until it is rooted and ready to transplant.Do this in the early fall and by late winter they should be rooted.I have done  it in pots but it requires watering.Root cuttings also will work.Just put a piece of root where they are to grow,during the winter.But this takes longer.A good strong rooted cutting will have a few berries the first year and will produce a full crop the next year with good care(water,fertilizerand mulch).Dont forget to prune the tip as they are growing as this will encourage side branches to grow and be busher.In black berries cuttings dontwork.Also look around a foot or more from the plant and you may find suckers growing especially if a root is cut by cultivation.You can transplant them.But it is simpler just to buy plants from Simmons.Avoid getting plants from unknown sources as they may be diseased or not true to variety.
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Oldiron
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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2012, 05:48:58 PM »

Just thought I'd give it a shot. They are looking wilted right now so it may be too hot to even think about it. Nothing else it's a learning exercise. 
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" An expert is somebody who has killed at least 10,000 plants" Bob Webster. I ain't there yet but I'm workin' on it!

A few miles north of San Antonio Texas

John Deere LA115
Western Auto Atlas front tine tiller
Shovels, forks, hoes, and other implements of destruction
Oldiron
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« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2012, 07:32:02 AM »

The plants I have came from Millbugers in San Antonio. They are one of the oldest nurseries in SA so they are pretty safe. Thought I was going to loose the lot yesterday evening. I have them in a shady corner of the deck but they still catch a few hours of the late afternoon/evening sun. Everything was wilted last night. Temperatures in the upper 90's.  About half, mostly the larger leaves came back over night. See what happens.
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" An expert is somebody who has killed at least 10,000 plants" Bob Webster. I ain't there yet but I'm workin' on it!

A few miles north of San Antonio Texas

John Deere LA115
Western Auto Atlas front tine tiller
Shovels, forks, hoes, and other implements of destruction
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