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Author Topic: Grits  (Read 1353 times)
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Neal
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« on: July 15, 2012, 03:54:15 AM »

What kind of corn should I grow for grits?
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robie robinson
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2012, 04:54:39 AM »

I've grown these OP corns all with success as meal,flour,polenta and grits. Wapsie valley, "J"reid dent, Truckers favortie (yellow and white)my favorite too, Floriani,first year so don't yet know about flavor, and Stubbe's orange. Truckers favorite is my favorite right now cuz the ears are good for roasting fresh and you can leave'em to dry and harvest for human and animal feed in the fall saving the best seed for a new year.

robie
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LSU2001
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« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2012, 05:09:19 AM »

I grew the Floriani Red this year and it produced very well for me.  I haven't ground any yet to eat so I can't say how it tastes.  However, I have provided a link to a Mother Earth News article on the variety.
Tim
LINK: http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/floriani-grain-corn-zm0z10zsto.aspx

Seed Source Link: http://www.starkeroundbarn.com/
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tbird
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« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2012, 08:56:15 AM »

  I grow plain old Boone's County Yellow "Dent Corn" or Boone's County White.  Both do great grits.    Wink
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Barking Dog Farm

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jerrybrother
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« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2012, 06:34:16 PM »

Hi,
I'm new here and still looking around.  The crows got my corn this year so no crop.
I was just curious if you are making gritts from ground dried hommony or just coarse ground corn.  Thanks
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Jerry
Pine Prairie,  LA
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« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2012, 06:56:01 PM »

jerrybrother>< Welcome to the Form, i think you will fine this Form very useful, and very Friendly, as for Grits there sure is a big difference between Grits & Hominy Grits, I like Both, but in my are reg Grits are hard to come by, there is a place i can get cornmeal ground, but he can't get his mill set to make grits, it comes out more like Chicken Chopes, i have been getting this Man to grind me 50# of cornmeal for the last 10 years, i just use reg. Field Corn, i know some of the old timey corn might be better, but i have a source of regular Field Corn

LakeRat1
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North East Concordia Parish / Lake St John
jerrybrother
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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2012, 08:33:35 AM »

Thanks for the welcome Lakerat1.  Its a great sight.
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Jerry
Pine Prairie,  LA
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2012, 08:16:47 AM »

Hi,
I'm new here and still looking around.  The crows got my corn this year so no crop.
I was just curious if you are making gritts from ground dried hommony or just coarse ground corn.  Thanks

  Welcome jerrybrother to this forum.   Wink


   Corn that is dried and not processed with and alakali before eating will not be nutritious.  In fact when corn became a staple food in Europe after Colombus introduced it he did not bring back the science of "nixtamalization."  Nixtamalaization is the process of processing corn with  lye water or another alkali to "open up" the nutrients and flavors that have been sealed up by drying.  Europeans experienced wide spread malnutrition after beginning to depend on corn as a staple.  Although they were eating lots of corn they were virtually starving to death for nutrients.  

  Please read this Wiki article and others on Nixtamal if you deal with dried corn as a food stuff.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization
« Last Edit: July 23, 2012, 08:28:06 AM by tbird » Logged

Barking Dog Farm

18.25 Acres in Central West Louisiana | USDA Zone 8b

Isaiah 66:22, 23, 24

Many, LA


Enough Farm Equipment to Run a Small Farm!


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LakeRat1
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« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2012, 03:19:30 PM »

Thanks Tbird, i enjoyed the Read, very interesting, There is one thing that i have wanted to do for a long time, is make some Hominy, I love it, maybe i will get around to trying that this winter, My mother cooked Hominy quite of often in the winter, it strange how people get use to eating different things, when ever my Mother cooked Mustard Greens, That was our Meal, not a side dish, and with that we always had Hot Water Cornbread & a pot of Hominy, i keep some on hand all the time, when making a soup, i almost always include some hominy in it,

LakeRat1
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North East Concordia Parish / Lake St John
jerrybrother
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« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2012, 04:41:01 PM »

I was was thinking about trying the red floriani corn. 
Do yall think it is stout enough to support pole beans? 
I use raised beds and try to maximize space.
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Jerry
Pine Prairie,  LA
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« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2012, 05:29:03 PM »

jerrybrother, i use raised bed also, but i dont raise corn in the beds, corn likes fertilizer, i would think that if you fertilize the corn well, it would grow strong stalks, to hold up bean vines

LakeRat1
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North East Concordia Parish / Lake St John
tbird
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« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2012, 05:42:05 AM »

  The corn stalk will support a pole bean and you do not need a lot of nitrogen fertilizer because the bean will provide the nitrogen through fixation.  That is the whole basis of the "Three Sisters Garden" with corn supporting pole beans and squash shading the ground to choke out weeds with the bans providing nitrogen to both the squash and corn.  It worked for the Eastern American Indians for many centuries and it will still work for you today.   Wink
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Barking Dog Farm

18.25 Acres in Central West Louisiana | USDA Zone 8b

Isaiah 66:22, 23, 24

Many, LA


Enough Farm Equipment to Run a Small Farm!


Click for weather forecast
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