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Author Topic: Corn and Wind Question  (Read 777 times)
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mudfish2
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« on: May 03, 2012, 06:23:35 AM »

We got a much need deluge yesterday. Cheesy  We also got some pretty good wind gusts.  Now 3/4 of my corn is lieing flat on the ground.  This is the first time I have grown corn so I do not know what to expect.

Will the corn stand back up?  Is it compost material now?  Do you just wait and see what happens?  Cry

Thanks!
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kingtiger
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« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2012, 06:29:45 AM »

Most if not all will stand back up. If its not broke of course.....
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« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2012, 06:45:24 AM »

Most if not all will stand back up. If its not broke of course.....

Mudfish,it will standback up i had my corn do the same thinglast year. it takes a while but it will
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Minnesota  "Land of 10,000 Lakes"   Zone  3/4   1- Hoe   1 - 18"  Poulan pro  reartine tiller  1- Small 12" tiller (for weeds) and 1 hoe  total garden rasberry's and pumpkin patch is about 50x80 or so.
AllisCA
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« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2012, 08:44:34 AM »

How well they recover depends on how far along they are. Prior to ears forming they do real well at coming back on their own. Might have bent feet but no harm done. After the ears form and they get top heavy recovery gets more difficult. However leaning corn can still produce as long as the stalks didn't get sheared off. I had a big storm roll through last year just before harvest. I did alot of bending over but the corn was OK. Some of it was lying flat on the ground. That corn was easy for critters to get.
I have a theory that growing corn is stages is not only good for a continuing harvest but also protects from storm damage. Some might be lost but smaller corn may survive where bigger didn't and therefore a whole season is not lost on one storm which for us is nearly a guarantee will come.
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Amanda,OH
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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2012, 09:44:39 AM »

I live very close to the water and the wind blows ALL THE TIME. To prevent my corn from blowing over I put up 4 stakes on each corner of each row of corn and put rope along the corn. This helps it stay up during the wind. I think if you carefully stand up the corn and use the rope, you will have a better chance. (Rope should pretty much touch the corn)

Example:

Key:

* = corn
| = stake
----- = rope

|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
 ***********************************************************
|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------|

Hope this helps! It saved me a crop 3 years ago!

-Jacob

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« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2012, 09:45:38 AM »

Sorry... my wording was bad... 1 stake per corner, 4 stakes total Smiley
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Been gardening for 4 years and absolutely love it!

1967 IH 424
2 row John Deere planter
3 bottom plow
7' John Deere tiller
8' disc
Sub-soiler/Ripper
Post hole digger
7' Woods Bush-hog
3 point fertilize spreader
7' tine rake
7' scrape

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coonhound
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« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2012, 01:21:06 PM »

Sorry... my wording was bad... 1 stake per corner, 4 stakes total Smiley

I do the same thing you do. Invariably we will get at least one good wind here and it always comes when the ground is saturated. I like to wait til the corn plant itself is fully mature but anytime I think a good wind will come up I get out there and stake it up.

And one word of advice. Its MUCH MUCH easier to stake corn while its still standing then to try and stand it back up and stake it at the same time (says the voice of experience.)
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northeast Missouri
mudfish2
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« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2012, 01:58:43 PM »

Great idea!  I'll give that a try!

Thanks!
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joeh20
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« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2012, 11:59:27 PM »

Mine blew over 3 times last summer, stood up every time. Getting a good layby, or hilling up around it helps. And I've found that if you can, planting a series of double row helps, even some will plant a triple row, that's even better. I doing both this year. May just go to all triple rows. I used to plant long 100 foot rows, now I try to plant 30- 40 foot rows and plant in blocks. Giving the wind somewhere to break through can help. Getting some dirt around the bottom is good for a moderate steady wind, nothing can help a severe downburst wind. My grandfather used to say, don't even look at the day it happens, that it will look better in the morning. The sun makes it stand back up. it's like it has muscles that pull it back straight. it might be a bit bent at the bottom, but it will still grow. If it is still straight but just leaning and the soil is really moist you can push it back straight up and add some extra soil to the base and tamp it firm with your foot. My wife does it barefooted, so she can get her foot right up to the stalk. It really works. And your shoes don't get muddy.
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jetboy7
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« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2012, 06:42:54 PM »

those are great ideas folks! I planted 4 100' rows of sweet corn and its very windy up on this hill, So I will definately use that rope method when they start to mature. Thanks!  Grin
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joeh20
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« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2012, 11:55:29 PM »

having corn in long rows is just easy, but having the same 400 foot in 20 by 20 foot rows would help with the wind or even 4 plots of 10 foot by 10 rows with a 5 foot break between them. If you know the way the wind will blow the strongest plant 4 rows of okra before the corn and fertilize it heavy and it will get so thick and strong that the wind won't get through it. You don't even have to pick the okra it will just make bigger stalks if you leave it be. I have never had okra blow over in a storm.
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Southern Tn hills, Zone 7-a, 50' by 80' backyard garden, Troybilt bronco tiller,
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« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2012, 05:54:32 AM »

Good idea joeh20, I will try that next planting.  Thanks!
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PD-Riverman
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« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2012, 10:53:56 AM »

I was raised that if the wind blew over the corn----The next day or days we hit the corn field and manually stood it back up and stomped the dirt to the roots to hold it. I do that now with my sweet corn if needed. I try to keep the dirt mounded around the bottom to keep the wind from blowing it over.
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mudfish2
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« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2012, 11:38:01 AM »

I never would have believed it but, all but one stalk has stood itself back up.  I went out there and tried to help it the next day but it just flopped back down.  They were kinda heavy and since they were bent at the bottom I figured there would be no-way that it could stand back up.  WRONG AGAIN!
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Zone 8A - Kabota L2900, Disc Harrow, Single Botton Plow, Box Blade, Auger, Delux Row Hipper, Bush Hog, Hooke & Crooke Heron, Taylor Pea Sheller, Hoss Wheel Hoe Planter, all manner of sweat producing hand tools & Great Neighbors!
joeh20
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« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2012, 11:15:13 PM »

It is almost miraculous. My mothers father farmed in upstate South Carolina, and usually had 2 corn crops a year, the late spring crop would get blown over quite often as the winds came pouring down the eastern slope of the mountains. Kind of like the Santa Anna's do in SoCal. He would always tell my uncles and cousins that farmed there, "Boys don't look at it today, it'll look better in the morning". And after the storm, sure enough, as long as it didn't have heavy ears yet and was just broke off, it would stand right back up. I have yet to actually lose a stalk. Having the patience to wait and see is the hardest part. But the sun can do some spectactular things with corn.
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